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The Choices

Which school is best for my child?

Which school is best for my child? - SFIAChoosing the right school for your child means arming yourself with as much information as possible. Consider the factors you think are important for your particular child. With this in mind, you must also consider practicalities such as the convenience of transport, the availability of places and the schools that your child’s friends are attending.

It is generally believed smaller schools and smaller classroom sizes are desirable. Low staff turnover, high levels of parental involvement and good provision of pupil progress reports are all good signs, along with a head teacher who has been in the job for several years, who demonstrates strong leadership.

There are various sources of information you can consult to get a feel for a school’s standards. There are ‘leagues tables’ in which the Government publishes information showing the comparative performance of all secondary schools, but these are notoriously difficult to interpret with any accuracy and don't help you decide whether a particular school would be suitable for your child.

You can look at exam results, percentages of pupils being presented for exams and school leaver destinations. The Government has legislated that these statistics must be set down in a standardised format in the school prospectus. The school prospectus is a good source for answers to many of the questions you may have about the way a school is run.
 

Ways to gain an insight into a school include:

  • Reading the school prospectus, newsletters and magazines
  • Looking at school notice boards – does there seem to be a positive attitude and lots going on?
  • Talking to people who have sent their children to the school
  • Talking to children who are currently pupils there
  • Attending open days
  • Looking at the facilities
  • Meeting the Head and Staff
     

On your visit to the school, you may also want to ask about:

  • Curriculum and Extra-curricular activities
  • Discipline and contact with parents
  • Parent teacher association
  • Pastoral Care
  • Religious and moral education
  • Assessment and reporting systems
  • Examination & Leavers
  • Special Educational Needs
  • After School clubs
  • Class size
  • School lunches
  • Transport

The Choices

Which school is best for my child?

Which school is best for my child? - SFIAChoosing the right school for your child means arming yourself with as much information as possible. Consider the factors you think are important for your particular child. With this in mind, you must also consider practicalities such as the convenience of transport, the availability of places and the schools that your child’s friends are attending.

It is generally believed smaller schools and smaller classroom sizes are desirable. Low staff turnover, high levels of parental involvement and good provision of pupil progress reports are all good signs, along with a head teacher who has been in the job for several years, who demonstrates strong leadership.

There are various sources of information you can consult to get a feel for a school’s standards. There are ‘leagues tables’ in which the Government publishes information showing the comparative performance of all secondary schools, but these are notoriously difficult to interpret with any accuracy and don't help you decide whether a particular school would be suitable for your child.

You can look at exam results, percentages of pupils being presented for exams and school leaver destinations. The Government has legislated that these statistics must be set down in a standardised format in the school prospectus. The school prospectus is a good source for answers to many of the questions you may have about the way a school is run.
 

Ways to gain an insight into a school include:

  • Reading the school prospectus, newsletters and magazines
  • Looking at school notice boards – does there seem to be a positive attitude and lots going on?
  • Talking to people who have sent their children to the school
  • Talking to children who are currently pupils there
  • Attending open days
  • Looking at the facilities
  • Meeting the Head and Staff
     

On your visit to the school, you may also want to ask about:

  • Curriculum and Extra-curricular activities
  • Discipline and contact with parents
  • Parent teacher association
  • Pastoral Care
  • Religious and moral education
  • Assessment and reporting systems
  • Examination & Leavers
  • Special Educational Needs
  • After School clubs
  • Class size
  • School lunches
  • Transport
Why Choose SFIA

There is nobody else in the marketplace that can offer the experience, specialisation and range of solutions we offer - read more

School Fees Calculator

Find out how much you can save on your school fees Try Free Calculator

Why Choose SFIA

There is nobody else in the marketplace that can offer the experience, specialisation and range of solutions we offer - read more

School Fees Calculator

Find out how much you can save on your school fees Try Free Calculator